Widow weaves for her children’s future

By Seia Soloi ,

2017 Hits

Faiese Nua, aged 54 from Solosolo.

Faiese Nua, aged 54 from Solosolo. (Photo: Sei’a Soloi)

No matter how hard life is and the struggle that every parent goes through, they put their children as their first priority.

 For Faiese Nua, aged 54 from Solosolo, the struggle she goes through every day is finding food for herself and her five children.

“My husband passed away five years ago so I am in charge of providing for my children,” she told Village Voice.

All of Mrs.Nua’s children are in school attending Maluafou and Leifiifi College with her oldest son in his final year at Leifiifi College.

“In our family no one works. I depend on my skill which is weaving mats every day and selling them. I spend most of my time weaving because none of my children work so this is our only way to earn money.

“I collect $150 tala for five mats a day. $30 tala is for the school fees of my children, even though it’s not enough but I try my best with my weaving skills to earn more.”

Faiese says that one of her friends has offered her a massive opportunity by paying one of her children’s school fees for this year.

“I’m grateful to one of my usual customers who always buys my mats. By offering to pay my son’s school fees for this whole year, it is a very big help for  my family.

 “If sales go well, then we buy a chicken; if it’s less then we buy elegi for food, and then there are our water and electricity bills and village and church donations.

Faiese prioritises her children’s well being, whatever struggle she is facing.

 “I know this is a hard living without a father but I try my best to give everything for my children making sure their future is bright. We have no plantation at all.

 “Even though I am struggling,  it’s the least I can do for my children because they are important to me.”

Her hopes for the future are to have a better house for her family and to continue working really hard with what she can to provide for her family.

© Samoa Observer 2016

Developed by Samoa Observer in Apia