Blessed are those who work

By Aruna Lolani ,

191 Hits

HARD WORKER: Wayne Savea of Faleasi’u-uta.

HARD WORKER: Wayne Savea of Faleasi’u-uta. (Photo: Aruna Lolani)

Work is work; it doesn’t matter what you do or where you work.

That is something Wayne Savea of Faleasiu-uta believes in.

The 30-year-old is a farmer. He plants a range of crops from taro to taamu. He also has a vegetable garden.

“I’ve been a farmer for eight years,” he tells the Village Voice. “It’s not easy work but it’s something that helps me support my family and helps me to energize my body from time to time.”

“And if you don’t work; the only feeling you get is being useless.”

Wayne stays with his wife and her family, and this is the family business in which Wayne has become involved with. The couple has been together for a long time and this is their way of earning a living.

“I think we earn more than we need. I mean if it’s a really good sales day then we usually make about $800 a day; that’s if we have a lot of orders.”

“We take some to sell it at the markets and then the rest; we deliver it to shops and everywhere else that have ordered from us.”

“It’s a good kind of business and I think it is a must for people to work our lands to make money.”

“I mean for those who don’t have jobs and still haven’t found jobs yet; I’m telling you this is the best way to make use of your time and earn something to support yourself.”

“It’s hard work but it will all be worth it in the end.” 

“I know most of our people don’t want to work this kind of job anymore or have anything to do with plantations; but maybe you should ask yourselves about why foreigners want our lands? Obviously there’s a benefit for them from this. I know.”

“For me; I do hope to continue with this line of business in the future and hopefully become more developed than it is now. Despite what anyone says or thinks; this is the best work that I’ve ever done.”

© Samoa Observer 2016

Developed by Samoa Observer in Apia